Eco Home Living homemade toothpaste

Published on February 29th, 2012 | by Lynn Fang

3

Homemade Toothpaste: No Fluoride Necessary

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homemade toothpaste

You’ve heard about all the controversy with Fluoride. Some dentists say it’s totally harmless, and others say too much fluoride causes all sorts of neurotoxic and endocrine disorders. Do we really need to fluoridate our toothpaste and our water supply at the same time?

Whatever you might be thinking, your average toothpaste is full of synthetic ingredients. Homemade toothpaste uses very few ingredients, making it the eco-friendly choice. It will taste different, that’s for sure. But at least you can count on simple, wholesome, healthy, and non-toxic ingredients – made with love.

DIY Natural has a super simple recipe for homemade toothpaste:

  • 2/3 cup baking soda
  • 4 tsp fine sea salt (optional, depending on your taste/tolerance for salt)
  • 1-2 tsp peppermint extract or 10-15 drops peppermint essential oil (or your favorite flavor)
  • water (add to desired consistency)

They’ve calculated you can save $3.50 – $4 per tube of toothpaste with your homemade version.

Mix and prepare your toothpaste in a small container. You can dip your toothbrush straight into the mix and begin brushing. If double dipping grosses you out, put the toothpaste in a ziploc bag and cut off a corner for a makeshift squeeze-tube.

If you want to zing it up a notch, Crunchy Betty’s discovered a coconut oil-based toothpaste that mimics regular toothpaste:

  • 3 Tbsp coconut oil
  • 3 Tbsp baking soda
  • 25 drops peppermint essential oil
  • 1 packet stevia
  • 2 tsp vegetable glycerin (optional)

Put the coconut oil and baking soda in a bowl and mash up with a fork until blended. Add the peppermint essential oil, stevia and optional vegetable glycerin and continue to mash and stir until you’ve reached toothpaste consistency.

There you have it! Simple, healthy, frugal, and fluoride-free tooth care.

Now the question is, Would you make your own toothpaste?

[Image from Shutterstock]





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About the Author

Lynn Fang is an eco-conscious writer, thinker, and Conscious Business Coach. She writes about sustainable living, social change, and personal growth at her blog, Upcycled Love. Follow her on Twitter or Google+.



3 Responses to Homemade Toothpaste: No Fluoride Necessary

  1. Matt Jabs says:

    And remember… you need much less toothpaste than most people use – just a pea size will do it. :)

    • Abbaci says:

      The big deal with hydrogen oidpxere for dental care is that it can react with the calcium (and calcum/tartar) in your mouth and cause black staining. Some folks who have used hydrogen oidpxere for a long time as mouth wash (like years and years) develop black tongue. Hydrogen oidpxere is an excellent antibacterial, it’s just this curious side-effect can be annoying. But using it in small amounts as you are is probably not a problem. I’ve heard glycerin also has anti-bacterial properlties, and can be used with baking soda to make more of a tooth paste. Brushing with vinegar once or twice a week supposedly reduces calcum/tartar deposits. Personally, I bath and brush with baking soda, diluted with water. I just put some in my mouth and brush, and it works fine. I’ve tried hydrogen oidpxere as mouthwash, and it was just too harsh. I have yet to try the glycerin and vinegar. I like how fresh my mouth feels after using diluted baking soda, but it doesn’t last as long as I’d like. Some folks say once you clean your mouth of bad bacteria and food particles, you need to plant the field so to speak with good bacteria, so they rinse with dilute probiotic, like acidophilus, or eat a spoonful of yogurt. Another person I talked to says he eats 2 acidopholis pills, literally chewing them so the bacteria get into his mouth and gums. It works fine for him, but I get bad reactions from probiotics, so I’ve skipped that idea.

  2. I’ve been wanting to make my own toothpaste for a while now. Where did you get the peppermint extract from?

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