Eco Home Living vaporindex

Published on May 10th, 2013 | by Andrea Bertoli

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Who Knew? Vapor Intrusion in your Home {an Infographic}

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We were recently sent this cool infographic and thought that you, inquisitive readers, might like to know about VAPOR INTRUSION.

Vapor Intrusion occurs when vapors and gases from contaminated soil and groundwater seep into indoor air posing potential health problems to the residents. These vapors move through the soil and seep through cracks in any type of home or commercial building with basements, slab foundations, or crawl-space foundations. The people most at risk include elderly, pregnant or nursing women, infants, children and those suffering from chronic illnesses. Vapor intrusion might manifest sickness, but this depends on the type of chemicals found, the length of exposure, one’s sensitivity to chemicals and the overall health of the exposed person. And as we know, low-level exposure to certain chemical over years may raise risk of cancer and chronic diseases.

Most states have some laws regarding Vapor Intrusion… but not all! If you live in the following states, contact your representatives NOW and get some rules on the books!

  1. Florida
  2. Georgia
  3. Kentucky
  4. Mississippi
  5. South Carolina
  6. Tennessee
  7. Arkansas
  8. Oklahoma
  9. Texas
  10. Iowa
  11. North Dakota
  12. Nevada
  13. New Mexico
  14. Utah
  15. Wyoming
  16. North Dakota
  17. Nevada
  18. New Mexico
  19. Utah
  20. Wyoming

click to enlarge or download!

This great infographic comes to us from EDR, where you can sign up to get your free neighborhood environmental report.






About the Author

Vegetarian chef, educator, blogger, and yogi based on the gathering isle of Oahu. Follow her foodie adventures at Vibrant Wellness Journal, Vibrant Wellness Education, Green Living Ideas and Green UPGRADER. Find more from Andrea on Facebook, , Instagram and Twitter.



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